Lidocaine and steroid injection in knee

Cervical Epidural Steroid Injections involve injecting a steroid into the epidural space of the cervical spinal canal where irritated nerve roots are located. The injected medications include both a long-lasting steroid and a local anesthetic (Lidocaine, Bupivacaine).
The steroid reduces inflammation and irritation, while the anesthetic interrupts the pain-spasm cycle and nociceptor transmission (Boswell 2007). The medicines spread to the most painful levels of the spine, reducing inflammation and irritation. The entire procedure usually takes less than 15 minutes.

Initially, 1 to mg/kg IV. If ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia persist, additional to mg/kg IV doses can be given every 5 to 10 minutes up to a total loading dose of 3 mg/kg. The same dose may be given via the intraosseous route when IV access is not available. There is inadequate evidence to support the routine use of lidocaine after cardiac arrest; however, the initiation or continuation of lidocaine may be considered after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) from cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia. If a maintenance lidocaine infusion is warranted for an individual patient, administer 1 to 4 mg/minute (30 to 50 mcg/kg/minute) IV. Use lower infusion rates for patients who are elderly,  have heart failure or hepatic disease, or are debilitated. Lidocaine is considered an alternative antiarrhythmic to amiodarone for this indication, particularly when amiodarone is not available. Lidocaine is convenient to administer but is not as effective as amiodarone for improving ROSC or survival to hospital admission among adult patients with VF refractory to a shock and epinephrine. Neither drug has been shown to improve survival to hospital discharge in cardiac arrest patients with VF.

Pain after a corticosteroid injection is not the norm, but it’s not abnormal either. I can’t speak to your situation, but I can say that occasionally patients will have what’s called “post injection flare” where the pain is worse for 2-3 days after the injection. I would tell patients to put ice on the area and as long as it’s not red, swollen or with discharge at the injection site, sit on it for a couple days to see if it resolves. If it’s not any better after 2-3 days, then come into the office. And just so you know, it does NOT mean the injection did or did not work correctly, and it does not matter which technique was used to get the steroid into the knee joint.

The following patients should not have this injection: if you are allergic to any of the medications to be injected, if you are on a blood-thinning medication (. Coumadin, injectable Heparin), or if you have an active infection going on. With blood thinners like Coumadin, your doctor may advise you to stop this for 4-7 days beforehand or take “bridge therapy” with Lovenox prior to the procedures. Anti-platelet drugs like Plavix may have to be stopped for 5-10 days prior to the procedure. Aspirin should be stopped for cervical procedures for 10 days prior, but not for Lumbar.

Fifty patients with chronic resistant cervicobrachialgia were randomly divided into two groups. Twenty-five patients (group A) were treated with cervical epidural steroid/lidocaine injections and 17 patients (group B) were treated with steroid/lidocaine injections into the posterior neck muscles. Another eight patients from group B were excluded from the study because they had started the process of litigation of insurance claims and their subjective analysis of pain relief might therefore not be trustworthy. One to three injections were administered at 2-week intervals according to the clinical response. All patients continued their various pre-study treatments: non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, non-opioid analgesics and physiotherapy. Pain relief was evaluated by the visual analogue scale 1 week after the last injection and then 1 year later. One week after the last injection we rated pain relief as very good and good in 76% of the patients in group A, as compared to % of the patients in group B. One year after the treatment 68% of the group A patients still had very good and good pain relief, whereas only % of group B patients reported this degree of pain relief. These differences were statistically significant. We failed to achieve significant improvement of tendon reflexes or of sensory loss in both groups, but the increase in the range of motion, the fraction of patients who were able to decrease their daily dose of analgesics, and recovery of the capacity for work were significantly better in group A. We encountered no complications in either group of patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Lidocaine and steroid injection in knee

lidocaine and steroid injection in knee

The following patients should not have this injection: if you are allergic to any of the medications to be injected, if you are on a blood-thinning medication (. Coumadin, injectable Heparin), or if you have an active infection going on. With blood thinners like Coumadin, your doctor may advise you to stop this for 4-7 days beforehand or take “bridge therapy” with Lovenox prior to the procedures. Anti-platelet drugs like Plavix may have to be stopped for 5-10 days prior to the procedure. Aspirin should be stopped for cervical procedures for 10 days prior, but not for Lumbar.

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